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Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Deity: Flargon the Traveler, part II

(My first issue with Blogger, could not make this all one post?  Oh well!)

At the NTRPG convention, I had a great time playing in the Mythrus Tower events using the Swords and Wizardry rules.  I played five of the six sessions, 4.5 sessions really, my alarm clock in the room was broken and the little sleep from driving and playing caught up with me on Saturday morning.  I rolled up a Cleric at the first session, and I made it through all five sessions and got out alive.  This is the deity I made up for Werner Mounte, cleric of Flargon the Traveller.

Lesser Deity
Flargon the Traveller, The Lone Walker
Alignment:  Neutral
Worshipers Alignments:   Lawful, Neutral
Typical Worshipers:  Bards, Caravan workers, explorers, anyone in need of safe travel or passage
Holy Symbol:  A small wooden wagon wheel worn as a pendant
Spheres of Influence:  Travellers, Safe passage, exploration

Flargon appears as a middle age man, with tanned travel weary skin and rough beard.  Dressed in simple brown robes and sandals, a knotted rope at his waist for a belt, he also always has a staff or 'Walkin Stick'. 

Many people even not devoted to Flargon will invoke his name while on the road or in a particularly harry situation while travelling.  Many roadside camps and caves have a small shrine to the god, thought to help in providing a safe and restful night on the road.  There are no permanent churches or holy lands to his followers, they do not stay in one place long enough that a simple shrine in a clearing or old ruins would suffice.

Clerics of Flargon often dress in travel stained brown robes, and the quarterstaff or walking stick is their "holy" weapon.  These clerics explore and travel constantly, helping those in need and keeping the roads safe for the itinerant.  They are also known to leave camps better than they found them, stacking extra wood, clearing brush, etc.  These men seek knowledge and enlightenment through travel and exploration, seeing the wonders of the world and seeking communication with cultures other than ones own.

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